EDSI Research and Dissertation Development Series logo

The EDSI Research and Dissertation Development Series consists of a series of online sessions to assist doctoral students with topics specific to research and the dissertation process. Sessions occur throughout the academic year and cover topics requested by students and faculty. Sessions currently being offered are listed below for the 2019-2020 academic year. A session description is provided, along with a link to register for each session. Additional sessions and topics will be added throughout the year.

Next Upcoming Sessions:

January 22, 2020 - Qualitative Data Management

February 12, 2020 - Conducting Observations

  • What Works in Schools: Using Research to Develop A Project with Lasting Impact
    What Works in Schools: Using Research to Develop A Project with Lasting Impact

    Presented by Dr. Laurie Kimbrel, Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership

    Session Description:

    Educators have been subjected to a variety of failed school reform efforts designed as simple solutions and political soundbites. As practitioner-researchers, we need to re-focus efforts on approaches that have real promise to improve outcomes for students rather than the politics of distraction that have been the focus of the last several decades. In this session, we will consider the power of collective efficacy, the research on high impact strategies, and the most common distractions to lasting reform. You will learn to look at potential research/dissertation topics through the lens of school improvement research in order to create a project with maximum impact in your school and potential to add value to the literature base.

    Dates: More information coming soon.

     

  • Finding Scholarly Literature
    Finding Scholarly Literature

    Presented by Duane Theobald, Director of the UWG Writing Center

    Session Description:

    Writing on any level comes with many challenges. One such challenge is often finding the right sources that will benefit your argument/main point/central concept. Time must be spent finding what sources you need, but what constitutes academic research and how do you find it? In this session, participants will get a brief review of what academic research is and why it is valuable. Additionally (and more importantly), participants will get a walkthrough of how to navigate an academic database, what you need to consider while in a database, etc. Participants will leave the session knowing how to conceptualize academic research and how to locate it easily.

    Date: More information coming soon.

     

  • Theoretical & Conceptual Frameworks
    Theoretical & Conceptual Frameworks

    Presented by Dr. Elizabeth Pope, Assistant Professor of Educational Research

    Session Description:

    In this session, I will present an overview to the concept of theoretical frameworks in research. I will discuss what theory is in research and how the concept of theoretical frameworks fits within conceptual frameworks (i.e. how a theoretical framework is related but distinct from a conceptual framework). I stress the importance of developing a theoretical framework from the literature related to a research topic and offer guidance on how to create a theoretical framework for a dissertation. Finally, I will discuss how a theoretical framework can evolve through the course of a project.

    Date: More information coming soon.

     

  • Making Sense of APA Style
    Making Sense of APA Style

    Presented by Duane Theobald, Director of the UWG Writing Center

    Session Description:

    APA Style--the very thought of it makes some writers and scholars shudder. While we know that every discipline has a style that must be utilized, writers often feel confused and overwhelmed with the myriad of rules, examples, etc. This session will focus on key aspects of APA Style and provide examples of how certain important parts of APA should be utilized (e.g. in-text citations, entries on the References page, etc.). Additionally, participants will leave with resources that will help them as they move forward with their writing--as citation styles should not be memorized but recognized & used properly.

    Date: More information coming soon.

     

  • Reporting Quantitative Findings
    Reporting Quantitative Findings

    Presented by Dr. Logan Arrington, Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology

    Session Description:

    Writing the results section of any research study can be a challenge. However, this is especially true for dissertations. You have collected and analyzed all of this data, but what is next? This session will address how to transform your raw results into a meaningful representation of your findings. It will cover aspects such as reporting the results of your statistical assumptions. Additionally, it is very easy for researchers to overstate the impact of their results in some cases. Following how to structure the results, this session will discuss appropriately and adequately representing your results. This topic will intertwine with a conversation about "significance" and the meaning of this term in quantitative findings. This session will be of interest to students working on quantitative or mixed method dissertation studies.

    Date: More information coming soon.

     

  • Academic Writing for the Dissertation
    Academic Writing for the Dissertation

    Presented by Duane Theobald, Director of the UWG Writing Center

    Session Description:

    Remember those pesky concepts you learned years ago in your early English classes? Initially, they seem like they're only needed for those and other related classes; however, we all know that to be untrue. This session will focus on several key writing concepts that are applicable to all writing--including the dissertation that you're working on! Participants will review concepts like supporting evidence, topic sentences, integrating quotations, etc. and how they can be factored into larger-scale writing. Additionally, participants will leave with a better understanding of how the Writing Process and all the parts therein can greatly benefit their work.

    Date: More information coming soon.

     

     

  • Introduction to Mendeley Reference Manager
    Introduction to Mendeley Reference Manager

    Presented by Dr. Mary Alice Varga, Director of the School Improvement Doctoral Program and Associate Professor of Educational Research

    Session Description:

    This session will provide an introduction to Mendeley. Participants will understand the core functions of Mendeley Reference Manager and the role it plays as a productivity tool in the dissertation process. Participants will install Mendeley, MS Word Plugin, and the Web Importer and leave the workshop with their own libraries built.

    Date: More information coming soon.

     

     

  • Instrument Reliability & Validity
    Instrument Reliability & Validity

    Presented by Dr. Logan Arrington, Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology

    Session Description:

    Data gathered during a research study is only as good as the instrument deployed to capture it! This session will explore two important concepts, reliability and validity, that must be considered before you deploy any instrument, researcher developed or existing. In this session, participants will learn the differences between these two concepts. Additionally, participants will learn methods/tests to examine in their instruments to ensure that their instruments are both reliable and valid.

    At the conclusion of this session, students will be able to :

    • Distinguish between reliability and validity
    • Identify methods for ensuring an instrument is reliable
    • Identify methods for ensuring an instrument is valid

    Date: More information coming soon.

  • Quality and Rigor in Qualitative Research
    Quality and Rigor in Qualitative Research

    Presented by Dr. Elizabeth Pope, Assistant Professor of Educational Research

    Session Description:

    In every research study, researchers must consider what makes research "valid" and rigorous. In quantitative research, researchers consider validity and reliability in their study. For qualitative research, these terms are not accurate descriptions of the concepts necessary to create a rigorous study of high quality. We must shift our thinking to questions of trustworthiness and ask ourselves, what makes our study credible, dependable, transferable, and confirmable? It is here that we can design a high quality and rigorous qualitative study. In this presentation, I will examine concepts of quality and rigor in qualitative research and discuss common methods used to ensure them in designing a study.

    Date: More information coming soon.

  • Conducting Interviews
    Conducting Interviews

    Presented by Dr. Elizabeth Pope, Assistant Professor of Educational Research

    Session Description:

    Qualitative interviews are a very common form of qualitative data collection in educational research. Researchers can even conduct studies where interviews are the sole data for the project. In this presentation, I will discuss the types of qualitative interviews (based on Roulston's six interviewing types found in Reflective Interviewing), best practices for conducting qualitative interviews, what to do after the interview is completed, and how to decide if interviews are right for your own project.

    Date: More information coming soon.

  • Conducting Observations
    Conducting Observations

    Presented by Dr. Elizabeth Pope, Assistant Professor of Educational Research

    Session Description:

    Observations have a long history in social science research. They are a good way to generate data that is based on behavior and human interaction, rather than reported experiences from a participant regarding the phenomenon of interest in a research study. In educational research, they can be invaluable in understanding the context, environment, and interactions within any research study. After providing a brief look at the history of observations and ethnographic research, I will discuss best practices when preparing to enter the field, ethical behavior in conducting observations, writing fieldnotes, and the benefits of observational data for educational research.

    Date:

    Wednesday, February 12, 2020  - 7:30 pm Register here for this session!

  • Qualitative Data Management
    Qualitative Data Management

    Presented by Dr. Elizabeth Pope, Assistant Professor of Educational Research

    Session Description:

    In qualitative studies, researchers often end up having A LOT of data, some of which will never be used in a project. When I was trying to decide on an approach for my dissertation (qualitative vs. quantitative), my mentor asked me: "Do you want more work on the front end or the back end?" This "back end" work is in qualitative research and refers to the time and focus it takes in organizing, managing, and analyzing qualitative data. In this presentation we will discuss the first two of those three concepts and go over strategies and technologies that help in managing qualitative data and organizing it for analysis.

    Date:

    Wednesday, January 22, 2020 - 8:00pm  Register here for this session!

  • Document Analysis
    Document Analysis

    More information to come soon

  • Quantitative Data Management
    Quantitative Data Management

    More information to come soon

  • Introduction to Qualtrics
    Introduction to Qualtrics

    More information to come soon

  • Introduction to SPSS
    Introduction to SPSS

    More information to come soon